Entanglement (2018)

Ben thinks his life his over after the end of his marriage. As he looks for ways to die, he finds a way to move on.

Directed by Jason James and written by Jason Filiatrault, Entanglement is an odd comedy about a man trying to kill himself after the woman he loved cheated on him and left. His wanting to die leads him into therapy as one would expect but also on a quest after finding out he almost had an adoptive sister. While looking for her, more about him is shown and his character is developed as an oddball who is oddly relatable and who is trying to survive against his own judgment of himself. The character is attaching and he is one that annoys at first and eventually grows on the viewer. The way this is written and put on screen makes the character feel human while still a bit odd while the entirety of film has a very specific feel to it that is hard to pinpoint but works for the story at hand.

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Phantom Thread (2018)

In one of the most known fashion Maison of 1950’s London, Reynolds Woodcock runs his business and life the same way, his way. His habits, demands, and eccentricities are to be followed by all or risk dismissal. After meeting the young Alma, he refuses to let things change, until she takes things in her own hands and finds her own way to make him happy.

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One Million B.C. (1940) [Blu-Ray]

At one time One Million BC was considered a real hit at the box office and even earned some Academy Award nominations. Today it’s a pretty clunky albeit ambitious movie that predates Roland Emerich’s “10,000 B.C.” by decades where it tells the tale of a group of cavemen and cavewomen with perfect hair and make up, trying to survive in the wastelands. Said wastelands include dogs dressed as elephants, giant badgers fighting giant snakes, and a lot of stunt animals over a flat screen blown up to look like dinosaurs. Saving the effort of claymation and stop motion, the effect is a major dud most times, as the animals never really look all too menacing.

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The Old Dark House (1932): Cohen Film Collection [Blu-Ray]

You could almost attribute the invention of the sub-genre involving travelers trapped in a house with a bunch of demented folks to James Whale. While there are no chainsaws or torture devices anywhere, you could see where the seeds were sewn for films like “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” and “The Haunting.” Whale’s film “The Old Dark House” presents glimmers of dark comedy and some pretty funny one-liners but through and through it’s an atmospheric and very creepy tale about a travelers trapped in a house with a psychotic brood. During a horrific rain storm, a group of travelers in the country side of Wales find themselves soaking wet and seeking shelter from the cold water barreling down on them.

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It (2017): [Blu-Ray/DVD/Digital]

Chalk it up to rock bottom expectations, but “It” blew me away when it arrived in theaters mainly because it exceeded my expectations and proved to be a stellar film all around. Andres Muschetti already killed it with his adaptation of his short “Mama,” but he brings his same sensibility in another coming of age tale where pure evil meets innocence. “It” is a masterstroke of a reboot, a movie that pays tribute to the original novel and re-invents every aspect from the ground up for a new audience without dumbing down the material.

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Go, Johnny, Go! (1959) (DVD)

The only reason to watch “Go, Johnny, Go!” is if you want to see some of the best rock and roll artists of all time do their thing on the big screen. Other than that, “Go, Johnny, Go!” is the story of the boring, milquetoast Johnny Melody, a bright eyed, blond white boy who rose from the slums as an orphan to become a rock and roll singer. It’s surprising that a movie featuring Ritchie Valens, and Chuck Berry would only focus on the most uninteresting individual, as when the movie stops to spread its paper thin premise with performances, it ironically becomes worth sitting through.

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Wayne’s World 2 (1993)

The follow up to the hilarious “Wayne’s World” has much more of a coherent ending, but that’s about all it has to offer. In the way of a sequel, rather than trying to continue bringing us new hilarious comedy bits like the car sing along, and product placement spoof, “Wayne’s World 2” either repeats those jokes in a new form, or extends them to where it’s boring. For some reason “Wayne’s World 2” is less a sequel and more of a spoof that confuses itself as some sort of David Zucker movie. The characters break the fourth wall constantly, ruining any momentum, and even touch on nineties fads once again. Instead, rather than a weird but funny appearance by the T-1000, there’s a cameo by the “Jurassic Park” T-Rex.

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Sid and Nancy (1986) [Criterion Collection] [Blu-Ray]

For someone who understands the punk rock world so well, Alex Cox is very quick to tear the nostalgia shades off of the viewers to depict a meeting of two lovers that was so intense it resulted in an unfortunate murder. “Sid and Nancy” are often romanticized by music lovers even to this day, but Alex Cox who brought us the masterpiece “Repo Man,” looks behind the gloss, picturing two unbearable, but real individuals. Director Cox paints a brilliant picture of two people spiraling in to oblivion, with a remarkable drama that’s less a biopic and more a chronicle of two doomed lovers. Sid Vicious and Nancy Spungen are a lot to drink in. From the moment we meet them, they’re loud, they’re parasitic and disgusting, but they form a relationship where they understand each other. In many ways they decided that they need each other to survive.

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