The Music of Silence (La musica del silenzio) (2017)

A young Amos is losing his sight, as he becomes blind and discovers his voice, he has to surpass obstacle after obstacle to reach his goal of singing professionally on the international stage.  Through this biography, the life and start of the career of Andrea Bocelli are explored in a way that sheds light on his difficulties and triumphs.

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Phantom Thread (2018)

In one of the most known fashion Maison of 1950’s London, Reynolds Woodcock runs his business and life the same way, his way. His habits, demands, and eccentricities are to be followed by all or risk dismissal. After meeting the young Alma, he refuses to let things change, until she takes things in her own hands and finds her own way to make him happy.

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Proud Mary (2018)

More “Leon: The Professional” than “Atomic Blonde,” Babak Najafi’s “Proud Mary” is a classic tribute to the blaxploitation films of the seventies that wears its intentions on its sleeves. It’s a film that feels like it would have been made in 1978 with Pam Grier as Mary, Bernie Casey as her ex-lover mobster boss. I wouldn’t be quick to call it a masterpiece, but through and through, it’s a sweet tribute, with some well drawn characters that’s almost brought down by its flaws in storytelling and editing.

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Ruby (1977) – Special “Elite” Edition [Blu-Ray/DVD]

The cult classic that spawned from the big craze from “The Exorcist” is finally on blu-ray in its original glory, as it was once butchered for television and altered for a wider audience. “Ruby” is a goofy film, albeit one of the most successful independent horror movies of all time, starring Piper Laurie whose undead husband begins haunting the family through her deaf and mute daughter. Despite some really striking scenes of horror, and some fine hammy performances from Laurie and the like, “Ruby” is pretty much a stinker.

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It Comes At Night (2017)

Trey Edward Shults’ “It Comes At Night” is a great movie, it’s also a poorly marketed movie by a studio that had no idea what to make of it. It’s a masterful dramatic thriller less in the realm of “The Walking Dead” and much more in the realm of “On the Road.” Shults definitely creates a film that focuses on the apocalypse and a family surviving through the apocalypse. But what Shults does is create an enemy that assures an inevitable and unstoppable death at the hands of a miserable disease that is inexplicable and remorseless. When we meet Paul, his wife and son Travis, they’re beginning to set their grandfather free in the woods where they plan to execute and bury him.

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