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The Bootleg Files: Hitler Lives

BOOTLEG FILES 644: “Hitler Lives” (1945 short film that won the Academy Award).

LAST SEEN: It is on YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: None.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS:
A mistaken belief that it is in the public domain.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely.

When the 18th Academy Awards were presented in March 1946, much of the attention was devoted to Joan Crawford winning the Best Actress Oscar for her comeback performance in “Mildred Pierce” and to Billy Wilder’s “The Lost Weekend” winning the Best Picture honors. Less attention was given to the Warner Bros. short “Hitler Lives,” which won the Best Documentary Short Subject Oscar. Unknown to the Oscar audience that night, “Hitler Lives” was not an original film, but rather a rehash of an Army training film. And calling the film a documentary was charitable, as the film was clearly more of a propaganda essay than a serious nonfiction production.
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Annie Hall: A Second Look

On this episode of “The Online Movie Show,” the spotlight shines on Woody Allen’s Academy Award-winning classic. Film critic Jerry Roberts is our guest, and he offers a unique perspective as an Alabama native viewing Woody’s New York.

The episode can be heard here.

“The Online Movie Show” is produced at the Platinum Wolfe Studios.

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Patty Duke Remembered

This week’s episode of “The Online Movie Show” celebrates the life and career of Oscar-, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actress Patty Duke. Our guest is William J. Jankowski, who co-authored Patty Duke’s posthumously published memoir “In the Presence of Greatness: My Sixty-Year Journey as an Actress.”

The episode can be heard here.
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The Bootleg Files: K-9000: A Space Oddity

BOOTLEG FILES 633: “K-9000: A Space Oddity” (1968 animated short).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: None.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS: It is uncertain what the problem is with this title.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely.

Fifty years ago this week, Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” had its theatrical premiere. It inspired controversy, debate and (for many moviegoers) a great excuse to get stoned in the cinema. It also inspired a cute animated short called “K-9000: A Space Oddity,” which was quickly produced and released within months of the Kubrick film.

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Ed Wynn: The Perfect Fool

For five decades, Ed Wynn delighted audiences with his brilliant clowning, making him a beloved star of Broadway, movies, radio and television. Late in his career, he reinvented himself as a dramatic actor of extraordinary power, earning a Golden Globe nomination for “The Great Man” and an Oscar nomination for “The Diary of Anne Frank.” On this episode of The Online Movie Show, Ed Wynn biographer Garry Berman discusses the life and career of this versatile entertainer.

The episode can be found here.

“The Online Movie Show” is produced at the Platinum Wolfe Studios.

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Is Bob Hope Funny?

We’re off on the road to laughs as the always provocative Anthony “The Kingfish” Vitamia returns to the podcast for a wild, no-holds-barred debate on whether Bob Hope should be acclaimed a great comic or whether he was the source of more groans than guffaws.

The episode can be heard here.

“The Online Movie Show” is produced at the Platinum Wolfe Studios.

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The Bootleg Files: Petroushka

BOOTLEG FILES 604: “Petroushka” (1956 animated short based on the Stravinsky ballet).

LAST SEEN: A copy is on YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: As part of a VHS anthology of John David Wilson’s animated films.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS: It seems to have fallen through the cracks.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: It is possible.

At least two generations of television-weaned cartoon lovers identify some of the greatest works of operatic and symphonic music by linking the landmark melodies to the knockabout mayhem of Bugs Bunny, Tom and Jerry, Heckle and Jeckle, Woody Woodpecker and Tex Avery’s menagerie. Of course, not every animation studio believed that the only way to approach classical musical was by having cartoon characters dancing on pianos or flooding an opera house. Disney did include comic highlights in his groundbreaking feature “Fantasia,” but he also mixed in segments of compelling artistic wonder – including an interpretation of Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” tied to the rise and fall of the dinosaurs.

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