Interview with Filmmaker Kirsten Keeton [Women in Horror Month 2021]

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Please introduce yourself.
My name is Kirsten Keeton. My friends call me Kirstie or KK. I’m 29 years old. A Leo. I feel like purple isn’t just a color, it’s also an attitude and I embody that. I enjoy a good cackle and Tatcha skincare products are my love language. I would love to think of myself as an intellectual, but some of my life choices… I talk with my hands, I’m an overactive listener, but I swear I’m not aggressive – I’m just passionate about a lot of random things. I love having my feelings manipulated by a good story – whether it’s narratively, visually, or both. Even going as far as when people lie to your face – I’m the kind of person that is so straight-forward because I’m a bad liar, but I can really appreciate a good lie. Those are stories, too – in every sense but that’s for a whole other conversation.

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Interview with Filmmaker Claire “Fluff” Llewellyn [Women in Horror Month 2021]

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Please introduce yourself.
Hi, thank you for including me in this interview series. My name is Claire “Fluff” Llewellyn and I’m a British writer/poet/actress/filmmaker living in Chicago.

When I moved to the US in 2004, I was still in my ‘band’ phase. I had been a lead rock vocalist and lyricist in the UK for several years, continuing this activity for a few more years in Illinois. Then I re-discovered a passion for acting, which lead to script writing. Events, meetings and collaborations immersed me in the local Indie Horror scene and prompted me to start my own production company, Bloody Brit Productions. I have produced, written and acted in five films under this label. I also appear on screen in other Indie productions, [and in lesser cases on major productions.]

Aside from film work, I am a self-published poet. My first book, LOVE is a KILLER, is a genre collection, my second book, RHYME & REASON: Facets of a Life, is not.

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Hercules and the Captive Women (1961): Special Edition [Blu-Ray]

Also known as “Hercules and the Conquest of Atlantis,” and “Hercules Conquers Atlantis,” Vittorio Cottafavi’s is not a total disaster of a Hercules installment. Surely, it’s a weird, bizarre, and occasionally dull picture, but if the sword and sandal films (or “Peplum”) are your bag, this might whet you’re appetite. With its American title, The Film Detective releases Reg Parks’ Hercules debut from Italy in its full form, restored from the original 35mm negative and in crystal 4K clarity.

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The Bootleg Files: The Hollywood Greats – Groucho Marx

BOOTLEG FILES 762: “The Hollywood Greats – Groucho Marx” (1979 episode of a British television series).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: None.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS: Fell through the proverbial cracks.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely.

Zeppo Marx is one of the most mysterious figures in film history. He appeared with his brothers Groucho, Harpo and Chico in their first five feature films at Paramount (and in a segment of a promotional film for the studio), but the union within his zany siblings’ antics was always tenuous. He was barely on screen in their first film, “The Cocoanuts,” and snagged a single memorable segment with Groucho in “Animal Crackers.” Zeppo got more screen time as the romantic interest in “Monkey Business” and “Horse Feathers,” but by their final film “Duck Soup” he was back to being an elusive on-screen presence.
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Top Five Christian Slater Movies (From a Slater Fanboy)

When I was a wee movie loving lad, I was big fan of Christian Slater. I thought he was such a cool character and everything he was in I would seek out. Everything from “Hard Rain” and “Broken Arrow,” to “The Wizard” and—yes—even “Mobsters.” Remember “Mobsters”? Imagine “St. Elmo’s Fire” but with violent Italian mobsters. In either case, many of Slater’s films have stayed a favorite of mine, including “Pump Up the Volume.” The film just garnered a deserved release on Blu-Ray and in celebration, I just had to compile my top five Christian Slater movies.

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Interview with Filmmaker Sophia Cacciola [Women in Horror Month 2021]

Please introduce yourself.
I’m a genre director working primarily with my production company, LAUNCH OVER, with my partner. I make weirdo, socio-political/satirical, surrealist horror and sci fi features. I also enjoy working as a cinematographer when I can! My features include the horror social satire, Clickbait (2019); the feminist vampire throwback, Blood of the Tribades (2017); the cerebral time-loop apocalyptic sci-fi, Magnetic (2016); and the murder mystery, TEN (2015). As a cinematographer, I’ve recently had a few shorts on the festival circuit including: Re-Home (Izzy Lee), Half-Cocked (Aaron Barrocas), Shiny Diamonds (Seth Chatfield/Toni Nagy), and Tea Time (Tara Price).

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Interview with Horror Hostess Miss Misery [Women in Horror Month 2021]

Please introduce yourself.
My name is Reyna Young AKA Horror Hostess Miss Misery, I am a Director, Producer, Author and all around geek when it comes to toys and comic books.

What is it that attracts you the horror genre for your chosen field of creative work?
Growing up I was always about horror, not sure why, probably my dad’s fault. He used to wake me up Saturday nights when I was young to watch two late shows. One called Monsters and then right after Tales from the Darkside which both shows were my favorite. I was not allowed to watch horror films quite yet but was obsessed with horror books and did watch the horror awards show when it was on every year. Horror is just something I can’t escape, I love it!

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Interview with Horror Author Alisha Rath [Women in Horror Month 2021]

Please introduce yourself.
My name is Alisha, I write under the pseudonym Angh Chu. I have publications in various genres, but horror is my passion. My hobbies include crossfit, hiking and I am currently obtaining my BA in Sociology.

What is it that attracts you the horror genre for your chosen field of creative work?
I’m not sure attraction would be an accurate depiction of my relationship with horror. I feel it has deeper value, stronger roots. I think I would describe it as a visceral fascination, an innate sense to delve further into the boundaries which encompass a societal view of “horror.” My focus is primarily on the tangible expressions of horror. I find people to be the scariest monsters in existence.

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