Monsoon (2018)

Writer-Director Miguel Duran’s “Monsoon” is one of the most beautiful dramas I’ve seen all year. In a sub-genre that’s often either overly exploitative or tends to be silly, “Monsoon” is a restrained and very subtle tale about loss, love, and trying to find the need to move on with your life. I knew very little about “Monsoon” going in, so suffice it to say I was taken completely by surprise. Miguel Duran really delivers a gem that audiences confronting the death of a loved one would be wise to see. “Monsoon” is a riveting and just downright heavy drama about death and the beauty of life, and I was sucked in from minute one.

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To Hell and Back: The Kane Hodder Story (2017)

Most horror fans know him as the man who played Jason Voorhees and who is Victor Crowley, to non-genre film fans, he’s showed up in all kinds of films in bits parts and lead roles. The man behind the highest number of cinematic kills in film history is much more than just a killing machine or simply a stuntman. Here Kane Hodder tells his own story, his own way, from being bullied as a child to a burn stunt gone wrong to becoming of the top genre players and stuntman in his industry.

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The Sin of Jesus (1961)

Up until the 1960s, the cinema depiction of Jesus followed a consistent standard in terms of how He was depicted – the long-haired, bearded, white-robed Jesus of Renaissance paintings – as well as in the manner of how He conducted himself. The big screen Jesus was a symbol of piety and respect, with filmmakers and actors working with a clearly defined parameter.
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Saving Brinton (2017)

This documentary focuses on Michael Zahs, a retired history teacher in rural Iowa who was responsible for rescuing rare nitrate films from the beginning of the 20th century that once belonged to William and Indiana Brinton, a pair of pioneering cinema exhibitors. The Brinton collection consisted of 130 films plus numerous magic lantern slides, and it also included a long-lost fantasy work from Georges Méliès called “The Triple-Headed Woman.”
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