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Travels in the Congo (1927) [DVD]

In 1925, French filmmaker Marc Allégret’s traveled to the French Equatorial Africa colonial region with writer André Gide to create a documentary record of the customs and cultures of the diverse tribal groups within the region. Unlike other documentaries of that era, most notably Robert Flaherty’s “Nanook of the North” and “Moana,” Allégret took an observatory approach to the subject, capturing the everyday life and special events of the African people.
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Poms (2019)

The way Roger Ebert felt toward “Bucket List” is kind of the way I feel toward “Poms.” While it is a movie that’s meant to be life affirming and celebrating old age, “Poms” watches like a patronizing, exploitative last gasp of a once excellent actress. For a movie that is meant to be fun and light hearted, “Poms” is painfully depressing while also being embarrassingly bland and silly when we get down to it. I’m all for movies that confront the idea of ageism and that nothing can hold us back from accomplishing our dreams, but “Pom” is absolutely disingenuous to its very foundation.

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Earwig and the Witch (2020) [Blu-Ray/DVD]

I’m one of the traditionalists that think Studio Ghibli should have stuck to hand drawn animation, but sometimes there’s just no fighting change. With “Earwig and the Witch” there’s so much new, that you’re almost tricked in to forgetting that the movie almost has no real narrative. At all. This is one of Studio Ghibli’s more aimless movies that doesn’t have a whole lot to it. Substantially, the movie packs in some great animation, and it’s quite startling how some of the motion for some scenes looks so realistic. I’m not going to say that the movie is an accomplishment in regards to Ghibli because Pixar has pulled off so much better.

Hell, Dreamworks has accomplished so much more with this medium.

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Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge (2020) [4K UHD/Blu-Ray/Digital]

I’m glad there’s a lot more momentum being picked up with “Mortal Kombat” as an IP, as the series deserves a cinematic universe. It’s a series filled with mythology, and alternate universes, and monsters, as well as some vicious gore. Despite past flubs with animated attempts at “Mortal Kombat,” Warner Bros. “Scorpion’s Revenge” is a solid return to the animated medium. It doesn’t re-invent the wheel as far as “Mortal Kombat” goes, but it’s a basic meat and potatoes primer that can act as an entry way for new fans.

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Honeydew (2020)

A couple goes camping in nature to reconnect and concentrate on what is important to them. They soon find out they are on a man’s property, but can’t easily leave due to car trouble. As they go walking to find phone service, they stumble upon a farmhouse where they are welcomed with open arms by an elderly lady seemingly wanting to help. As they spend the night there, things take a turn for the odd and dangerous.

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Mortal Kombat (2021)

I’m one of the many who were there when “Mortal Kombat” crashed through America in 1992. Going from an arcade hit everyone talked about because of its vicious violence, to a home console darling, “Mortal Kombat” is a prime franchise candidate that was sadly snuffed out in 1997. After the absolute embarrassment of “Mortal Kombat: Annihilation” it took two decades for “Mortal Kombat” to finally return as a potential cinematic/franchise heavyweight.

Is Warner Bros.’ and Simon McQuoid’s reboot perfect? No. But hot damn it is good!

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