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The Bootleg Files: Snack Boy

BOOTLEG FILES 711: “Snack Boy” (1998-2001 online video series starring Terry Crummitt).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: None.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS: Long-forgotten pioneering production of online-exclusive entertainment.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely at all.

Did you ever stop and ask yourself: where did the concept of an online video star begin? After all, we are currently overburdened with characters who have become rich and famous by making wacky videos for YouTube. But there had to be a time and place where this show business phenomenon actually took root, yes?
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The Elvis Movies

Elvis Presley was the king of rock ‘n’ roll, but he was also one of the most popular film stars from the mid-1950s through the late 1960s. In this episode of “The Online Movie Show,” film historian James L. Neibaur, author of “The Elvis Movies,” considers Elvis’ cinema output and place in film history.

The episode can be heard here.

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Moby Dick: The Radio Play (Part 2 of 2)

Cinema Crazed’s Phil Hall makes his playwriting debut with this radio drama based on the Herman Melville masterpiece. This is the second of a two-part presentation, directed and produced by J. Timothy Quirk and presented via the syndicated radio program “Nutmeg Chatter.”

The episode can be heard via this link.

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The Bootleg Files: Love

BOOTLEG FILES 710: “Love” (newly bootlegged version of a copyright-protected restoration of a 1919 comedy short starring Roscoe “Fatty” Arbucke).

LAST SEEN: On YouTube.

AMERICAN HOME VIDEO: This just appeared online two days ago.

REASON FOR BOOTLEG STATUS:
Someone must have thought it was okay to rip off the presentation because the source material is public domain.

CHANCES OF SEEING A COMMERCIAL DVD RELEASE: Not likely at all.

The basic premise of this column is to highlight rare film and television productions that can only be seen in bootlegged prints and unauthorized online video postings. The column has never encouraged bootlegging of copyright-protected work. On occasion, this column has considered public domain titles that are the subject of endless duping because of their lapsed copyrights – and in too many cases, the only way that one can appreciate those works is by enduring the duped versions.
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Making Waves (2019)

Here is something that you don’t see every day: a documentary that gets its facts wrong.

Viewers with little knowledge on the history of sound technology in filmmaking are advised to stay away from Midge Costin’s feature, which gives a cockamamie overview of the audio aspects of the cinematic experience. Costin appears to be under the impression that movies were completely silent between Edison’s failed sound film experiments of the late 1890s and the Warner Bros. releases of “Don Juan” and “The Jazz Singer” in the late 1920s – in reality, there were numerous experiments taking place to create the so-called “talkies,” and many of these works still survive and are widely available for review.

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Bela Lugosi in White Zombie

Bela Lugosi is back in the “Online Movie Show” spotlight with a special episode devoted entirely to the landmark 1932 “White Zombie.” Our guest is award-winning writer Brad A. Braddock, author of “Memoirs of Murder: A Prequel to the 1932 classic, White Zombie” (published by Arcane Shadows Press).

The episode can be heard here.

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Lon Chaney Jr.: A Second Look

Although Lon Chaney Jr. secured a spot as horror film royalty by playing the title character in “The Wolfman,” his best work often occurred outside of the horror genre. In this episode of “The Online Movie Show,” film historian Troy Howarth explores Chaney’s erratic but often intriguing career, tracking his remarkable work in “Of Mice and Men” and “High Noon” and his shaky endeavors as “Son of Dracula” and in the “Inner Sanctum” series, with a pause to address the urban legend surrounding his live television “Frankenstein” performance.

The episode can be heard here.